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There she is in the middle of Cambridge, Massachusetts. Sam Peckinpah and the Rose of Ultraviolent Movies still remains a work of indispensable scholarship. Or for that matter, the one on Twin Peaks? It is a visceral and astonishing work. It is also vital. In this way, VR is completely different from Imax projections, or from cinema watched through 3-D glasses. Directors and artists have to choreograph narratives in space rather than in frames, and they must also calculate for a constantly shifting point of view. The Locarno Film Festival has announced that Olivier Assayas will preside over the International Competition jury of the seventieth edition running from August 2 through July 9 through Mack mines Americana, its artifacts, folklore, and rituals, and explores American vernacular traditions, examining their shifting role in a dialogue between the history of art making and the culture of collecting.

Through all new objects, Junk Kaleidoscope will re-envision The Fair in a way that weaves together over two decades of work, sixty miles from the Durham Fair fairgrounds that inspired this project. The Fair was first realized in , when Mack entered all seventy-three craft categories at the Durham Fair, the largest agricultural fair in Connecticut; she had participatedin the fair, located near her hometown of Guilford, CT, throughout her childhood. In , she remade the project as The Fair 10 th Anniversary Edition by generating new entries for all of the craft categories available that year.

On both occasions, the objects were displayed at the fairs and then re presented in a commercial gallery with their winning ribbons. At The Aldrich, Mack will create a layered exhibition that engages fairs in new ways. For Junk Kaleidoscope , she will utilize a self-generated list of seventy categories—comprising actual competition categories collected from various county and state fairs, as well as those of her own invention—to generate and support the works in the show.

The list will serve as a catalyst for production and as a framework for understanding the shifting, participatory display that the objects will enjoy at The Aldrich. Mack attends county and state fairs nationwide, where her experiences fundamentally reshape her approach to the creation and staging of her work. These objects are symbolic containers of a collective memory that can travel across time.

Ultimately, Mack positions herself as both an artist and maker, placing herself inside a subculture and adopting its system of classification for her own re invention. This enables Mack to move seamlessly between two distinctive locales and contexts, each of which has its own structure, methodology, and currency. The objects embody these alternating experiences and distinguishing histories.

Generous funding for Anissa Mack: Shared Space features contemporary artists from twelve countries: These artists capture myriad spaces for communication and interaction—urban and rural landscapes,homes and backyards, city streets and plazas, and ports and terminals. Photographs by Raghubir Singh, Thomas Struth, and Massimo Vitali depict masses of people gathering in public spaces from Los Angeles to Vietnam, and the Netherlands—expressing an unprecedented universality of access to information. Matelli will debut his singular, larger-than-life-size outdoor figurative sculpture on May 6, Based on an ancient Greek statue of Hera and poised atop a pedestal, the statue, fabricated out of cast stone, is painstakingly aged to mimic a centuries old patina.

An imposing nine-feet tall and sited on a three-foot tall pedestal, the neo-classical figure will be juxtaposed with flawlessly hand-painted cast bronze watermelons, whole, halved, and quartered, that balance upon her head, within the creases and folds of her drapery, and at her feet. These faux-perishables, poised upon the intentionally eroded and debased figure, are presented in an eternal state of freshness. In doing so, Matelli stages opposing entropic forces, the synthetically preserved, and the forcibly decayed.

Suspended in changing physical states or transformative stages of existence, his work concerns the very circumstance of actuality, joining the ordinary with the speculative in order to assess cultural worth: Recent solo exhibitions include the State Hermitage Museum, St. A mid-career survey, Tony Matelli: He lives and works in New York City. Past recipients include Tom Sachs and Jackie Winsor. This exhibition premieres a series of new works, all painted in black and white, which the artist has completed since The exhibition will include fourteen works on paper, as well as two monumental wall paintings, the largest incorporating two walls and covering over square feet.

Rosen approaches written language as structure, with words and letterforms functioning as building blocks, and where, through unusual typographic arrangements, words and phrases can embody the thing they are describing. Realizing that the aspects of language that most interested her needed to be expressed visually, for the past four decades Rosen has channeled her exploration of language through color, scale, art materials, and non-linear composition.

Additional support is provided by Hotel Zero Degrees, Danbury. If so, what are its characteristics? And more importantly, what does Contemporary Art suggest about the future of society? Generous funding for William Powhida: Noonan, and Janet Phelps. This exhibition will present three interrelated bodies of work, the Potential Future Drawings series —present , Mobiles —present , and the Future Past Drawings series —present. She exposes the inherent beingness underlying daily phenomena through a manipulation of reality, an externalization of internal sensations, and a deft employment of humor, ultimately challenging our perception of the human dimension.

In , Campbell introduced her now-acclaimed Potential Future Drawings series, channeling the Surrealists to give tangible shape to interior monologues. She begins with an event in her own life, and then uses a diagrammatic system to create a latticework of potential outcomes from the most wanted to the most devastating.

Campbell mirrors our inward desire for mass acceptance and wide success, while also tapping into our general fear of ultimate failure and crushing embarrassment. Comprised of bent steel and wire, some in taut primary colors, they vary in size—from body size to architecturally scaled—and cast shadows and create pulsating optical patterns that mime the circulatory matrix of her drawings. The Future Past Drawings series, initiated in , includes the newest work in the exhibition. All the drawings in this series are on black paper and, like the Potential Future Drawings , they operate as a flowing feed; reflecting back and looking forward, they conflate personal and historical experience, in the end considering how subjectivity reshapes the past to condition the future.

Generous funding for Beth Campbell: Spanning twenty-five years, Just Left Feel Right focuses on works from specific periods of her career that share a distinctive commonality, capturing the eruptive and disparate voices of a shifting American vernacular and its rippling effect on the way we communicate in our hyperkinetic time.

McClelland is most widely known for her deft use of linguistics and her sensually textured surfaces. She mines the ways in which communities speak, collecting language and choosing words that trend, are debated, heard on street corners, and absorbed from streaming news feeds; words that are rich in meaning, that reach and multiply, that drop in and out of everyday life. The words she selects hover between materials; letters press up against each other, run off the surface, join together, dissolve, loop, and collide into and onto themselves.

Employing a wide range of materials, her compositions have a rhythm and beat as they perform, throb, and swagger, capturing the cadences of our speech, mimicking the physicality of how people express themselves. Pauses, utterances, and hysteria, the inflection of tone and the modulation of our tempo, bodily expressions and gesticulations, all are translated into painterly rhythmic compositions modeled after oratory repartee. McClelland seizes these audible sensations, stealing words right out of the mouth, but also embodying our micro-expressions.

In , she began to incorporate numbers into her work as a reaction to the data onslaught of the Internet age. A mind-numbing rush of streaming lists for everything and anything are published on the Web. McClelland, a collector of messaging, in particular emotive and directional information, began researching the data that represents the individual and vice versa. This endless data stream is how twenty-first century society forecasts outcomes: Just Left Feel Right will also include many other never-before-exhibited works from past and current series. She lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a full-color, soft-cover scholarly publication, available during the exhibition, intended to serve as an enduring archival document and limited-edition artwork. It will include images of the works in the exhibition, a checklist, an essay by the curator, and a poster designed by the artist. Generous funding for Suzanne McClelland: A full-color, soft-cover scholarly publication will be available during the exhibition. Virginia Overton is a site-responsive artist.

Her sculptures and installations appear minimally composed, but their engagement with the features of a space—as well as its exterior and the landscape—generates a maximalist sensation from an efficiency of means. For The Aldrich, she has created thirteen site-reactive sculptures and a video, presented inside the galleries, in the Sculpture Garden, and on the roofline. Each informs the other as the works reverberate throughout the building and boomerang out onto the grounds, offering multiple lines of sight.

Some works feature indigenous materials scavenged on the premises alongside items Overton collected at the studio or recycled from past installations. Overton transposes the energy encapsulated within these objects, draining them of their normative purpose, and imparting them and their circumstances with a new functionality.

Whether reflecting the architectural features of a gallery or the contours of a natural landscape, Overton assesses the material—studying and learning its physical properties, seeing how far it can go, how much it can withstand—as it is processed through countless hours of experimentation. Once installed, her space-shifting sculptures and installations, through a process of re-articulation, demonstrate the inherent being-ness of an object, its materiality, its connection to a specific place at a particular time, inviting the viewer to navigate it anew as elements emerge and vanish from up close and at a distance.

During a career that now spans over four decades, Kim Jones has created a singular and subjective body of work based on both extreme personal experience and a wide range of artistic influences. Commentary about his work often dwells on details of his biography, which include surviving a severe childhood illness and serving in the Marines during the Vietnam War. The title of this exhibition, White Crow , refers to the extremely rare occurrence when a crow is born without any pigment in its plumage. This marks the bird as not only an outsider, but also, in folk mythology, as an omen of impending change.

It should be noted that Jones thinks of White Crow , which includes some individual elements that Jones has worked on over a thirty-year period, as one continuous installation, echoing the importance of memory and the life he has lived in his practice as an artist. This installation, which was created during a ten-day residency at the Museum, involved the transformation of a grove of four small crabapple trees in front of The Aldrich into a festooned and wrapped sculpture.

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Obsessive and labyrinthine, these drawings evoke the diagrammatic battle drawings done by children with their aerial perspective, weapon trajectory lines, and geographical and architectural abstraction. Generous support for Kim Jones: Typed on an Olivetti manual typewriter, these proposals—complete with typographical errors and hand annotations—describe ideas from the practical to the far-fetched.

Liversidge wrote sixty proposals for The Aldrich all of the typescripts are included in the exhibition , and twenty-three have been chosen for realization, guided by the concept of connecting the interior of The Aldrich Museum with both the surrounding landscape and the community. The artist sees his proposals as gentle invitations, not explicit instructions—which is different from most art that is based on written directives—and the realization of a specific proposal is always open to negotiation, a fact that reveals his interest in expanding conventional notions of authorship.

He is just as interested in the proposals that are not realized, as they are ready to be brought to life in the imagination of each reader. The Museum would like to thank the restaurants, shops, and other venues that have participated: Two of the groups have been installed at The Aldrich: Generous support for Peter Liversidge: Williams and Keris Salmon. The project is understood as one continuous action that is expressed in a myriad of sculptural moments. Brooks uses the distinctive form and function of the disassembled combine analogously, allowing it to mirror the philosophical impasse at which we find ourselves as our hyperkinetic era faces an escalating ecological crisis.

The installation stages a metaphor. A combine harvester provides a quantifiable service: Through an elaborate mechanization of moving parts it produces a product. Similarly, an ecosystem, representing a complex set of organisms and their environment functioning together, serves a life-sustaining purpose clean air, food, energy, and filtered water and is mistakenly likened to a mechanized instrument. Brooks makes a compelling visual correspondence here.


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He has chosen to group the machine parts into nine zones that represent nine ecosystem services that occur continuously in our biosphere and upon which we rely daily: Continuous Service Altered Daily ultimately attempts to channel evolutionary time. A John Deere combine is a symbol of nineteenth-century innovation updated in a twentieth-century model. Brooks captures this progression through four stages of presentation, and thus likens it to the processes of interconnected life forms themselves.

The wear and tear over its forty-year existence is self-evident in a rusty green corn head past. The machine is then stripped of its lived history as its age is sandblasted away present. Shiny objects with a fetish finish are re-presented as ornaments or modernist tabletop sculptures future. But this is a temporal arrangement, one that marks time and space by compressing it within a schematic system that is itself impermanent. Generous support for David Brooks: Ridgefield, CT May Four Solo Exhibitions Engaging Place.

Other sculptural works were fabricated on-site during the installation period, incorporating elements harvested from the tree as well as items found around the Museum property and neighboring community. Once installed, her space-shifting sculptures and installations produce shadows, light leaks, and sound echoes that, through a process of re- articulation, demonstrate the inherent beingness of an object, its materiality, its connection to a specific place at a particular time, inviting the viewer to navigate it anew.

Painting in Four Takes

Her sculptures and interventions are made up of indigenous readymade objects and materials Overton scavenges from within the surrounding community. Virginia Overton is part of Site Lines: This series of exhibitions also features David Brooks, Kim Jones, and Peter Liversidge, presenting site-specific commissions, ranging from sculpture to drawing and performance-based works. Gravel Mirror , a work by the influential artist and writer Robert Smithson, incorporated gravel found on the grounds of The Aldrich, and was a significant touchstone for the development of this exhibition series.

Overton was born in Nashville, Tennessee and lives and works in New York. Founded by Larry Aldrich in , The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum is dedicated to fostering the work of innovative artists whose ideas and interpretations of the world around us serve as a platform to encourage creative thinking. It is the only museum in Connecticut devoted to contemporary art, and throughout its fifty- year history has engaged its community with thought-provoking exhibitions and public programs.

The Aldrich, in addition to significant support from its Board of Trustees, receives contributions from many dedicated friends and patrons. For his first solo museum exhibition in the United States, currently on view at The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, British artist Peter Liversidge wrote sixty proposals, including performances and physical artworks across a variety of mediums. Of these, twenty-four have been selected for realization and—with some help from local residents—will be presented at the Museum and in the surrounding neighborhood as part of Site Lines: Typed on an old manual typewriter, these proposals—complete with typographical errors and hand annotations—describe ideas from the practical to the far-fetched.

Unlike LeWitt, however, he is anything but a formalist, engaging every conceivable approach to cultural production with an emphasis on ideas that are extremely accessible to the general public. His work is a reminder that art can be created out of almost anything and that realizing a simple idea can result in anything but a simple outcome. This series of exhibitions also features David Brooks, Kim Jones, and Virginia Overton, presenting site-specific commissions, ranging from sculpture to drawing and performance-based works.

In , Peter Liversidge began collaborating with Low , a band from Duluth, Minnesota, which ultimately resulted in Liversidge creating a backdrop for their international tour as well as several album covers and release proposals. Peter Liversidge lives and works in London, England. Throughout his practice, Brooks investigates the tenuous relationship between our ecological life and technological industry.

Brooks born , Brazil, Indiana presents every single part of a used John Deere combine harvester in his exhibition at The Aldrich, which will be on view through February 5, Distinctive elements like the corn head and cab remain unaltered in a weathered John Deere green, while other parts are sandblasted, removing rust, paint and all traces of wear and tear; still others, like pipes and fittings, are brass-plated and housed in museum vitrines, the traditional trappings of highbrow art objects or precious natural history displays.

A combine is the ultimate example of agricultural technology, the otherworldly design of its bulky metal body concealing the integration of all stages of the harvesting process into one machine designed to reap grain, a resource that the efficiency of a combine allows us to take for granted as eternally and inexpensively available. This series of exhibitions features Kim Jones, Peter Liversidge, and Virginia Overton, presenting site-specific commissions, ranging from sculpture to drawing and performance-based works.

David Brooks is a New York-based artist whose work investigates how cultural concerns cannot be divorced from the natural world, while also questioning the terms under which nature is perceived and utilized. In he received a grant from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, and in a research grant to the Ecuadorian Amazon from the Coypu Foundation.

He is currently on the faculty of the Maryland Institute College of Art. It is the only museum in Connecticut devoted to contemporary art, and throughout its fifty-year history has engaged its community with thought-provoking exhibitions and public programs. Artist Kim Jones connects nature, culture, and memory through a material- and labor-intensive intervention into the galleries and surrounding landscape of The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum. His exhibition, White Crow, part of the presentation Site Lines: Jones born , San Bernardino, California has created a singular and subjective body of work based on extreme experiences that deeply affected his life and art making.

He identifies himself as an outsider, and this estrangement has been played out through an interrelated series of performances, sculptures, drawings, and writings that exhibit a range of elemental and expressionistic impulses. White Crow refers to the extremely rare occurrence where a crow is born without any pigment in its plumage. Aldrich exhibitions director Richard Klein, the curator of the exhibition, explains: The rat, which appears frequently, he identifies with as a species that, although usually reviled, is resourceful and intelligent, and lives in close association with human society.

White Crow is part of Site Lines: This series of exhibitions also features David Brooks, Peter Liversidge, and Virginia Overton, presenting site-specific commissions, ranging from sculpture to drawing and performance-based works. For over thirty years he has been working on a consistent oeuvre of drawings, sculptures, and performances—war drawings, rat sculptures, combat vehicles, and performances as his alter ego Mudman—that all have their origin in his personal experience, including his participation as a soldier in the Vietnam War and the illness that kept him in a wheelchair between the ages of seven and ten.

Join or renew at this level until September 30, and receive the official Aldrich Member Tote! New Benefit for ! The last one hundred years have witnessed the explosion of virtually every available means and medium in the service of art making, yet painting has not only maintained a central position in visual art, but has also adapted creatively to rapid changes in our culture as a whole.

Today, painting is embedded in the broad debate of actual vs. This fall, The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum in Ridgefield, Connecticut, will present Painting in Four Takes , a series of solo exhibitions that will provide a window into the practices of four engaging painters who imbue the medium with relevance and character. The series, on view from November 15, , through April 3, , will mark the first time in over twenty years that The Aldrich has dedicated all of its galleries to painting.

The four exhibitions will be celebrated at a free opening reception from 2 to 5 pm on Sunday, November 15, to which the public is invited. In a career that spans three decades, Steve DiBenedetto b. Evidence of Everything is his first major solo museum exhibition. DiBenedetto has consistently rejected formalism throughout an era where both formal and conceptual approaches to painting have become de rigueur, taking. Utilizing an inventory of leitmotifs, including the helicopter, octopus, wheel, and glass office tower, DiBenedetto paints and repaints his subjects in states of apocalyptic trauma where content and technique become unified, while the boundaries between the objective and subjective become uncertain.

Through his work, DiBenedetto has cast himself as a kind of baroque symbolist, working in the deep tradition of European Romanticism, with his excesses tempered by a terrible, yet transcendental beauty. Evidence of Everything has been organized by Aldrich exhibitions director Richard Klein. The practice of Hayal Pozanti b. For her first solo museum exhibition, she will debut a new series of paintings and digital animations. Pozanti negotiates two opposing image- producing interfaces, the digital, with its mechanical, frenetic pace, and traditional studio practice, with its slowness, imperfection, and tactile insistence.

Embedded within these shapes are bundles of mined data relating to the impact of contemporary technological developments on human lives. Through this process, Pozanti acts as a digital-to-analog encryption system so as to preserve information that could be lost or altered in the cloud. Her movement, from freehand to track pad, reinforces her intent, so that the final composition is equally successful online and in person.

Alongside her paintings, and sometimes shown side by side, she creates digital animations, both informed by her back and forth translation of mechanical and digital processes and her desire for the means via which they are seen to be interchangeable, non hierarchical, and streamlined. For her first solo museum exhibition, Julia Rommel b. All are intimately connected to their edges, as they are stretched and re-stretched numerous times over the course of their making in. For more than two decades, she has worked within the language of abstract painting, exploring the physical and illusory boundary of wall and object, foreground and background, even inventing her own color wheel to challenge canonized color theory.

Old, Odd, and Oval , will focus on her latest body of work, medium- to large-scale to site-engaged paintings that demonstrate her experimentations with new materials and fabrication methods as she combines hand-painted Plexiglas with colorful fabric patterns she designs digitally. These small, shaped, works on paper are geometric abstractions that feature quirky cartoonish elements to rupture color fields—madcap flourishes humanizing pure abstract reduction.

Each exhibition will be accompanied by a free, fully illustrated, full-color publication with an essay by the curator.

Root began making the bookmarks when she had finished a large body of work and was trying to restart her practice by reading art books, bookmarking images as she read. It was as if these huge monumental paintings became smaller and elongated, functional and bookmarking other things that I wanted to think about or incorporate into my work. Founded by Larry Aldrich in , The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum is dedicated to fostering the work of pioneering artists whose interpretations of the world around us serve as a platform to encourage creative thinking.

The Aldrich is one of the few independent, non-collecting contemporary art museums in the United States and the only museum in Connecticut devoted to contemporary art, and engages its diverse audiences with thought-provoking, interdisciplinary exhibitions and programs.

Sara Cwynar

Generous support for Hayal Pozanti: DiBenedetto has consistently rejected formalism throughout an era where both formal and conceptual approaches to painting have become de rigueur, taking a position where the canvas and the act of painting initiate a site for struggle, invention, and, ultimately, reinvention. Curated by Richard Klein. Generous support for Steve DiBenedetto: Pozanti negotiates two opposing image-producing interfaces, the digital, with its mechanical, frenetic pace, and traditional studio practice, with its slowness, imperfection, and tactile insistence.

Curated by Amy Smith-Stewart. All are intimately connected to their edges, as they are stretched and re-stretched numerous times over the course of their making in a physical wrangle of layering and effacing. Generous support for Julia Rommel: It is the mission of the Public Programs and Education department of The Aldrich to foster direct interaction with contemporary art and artists, inspire and nurture ideas that cultivate critical and creative thinking, encourage curiosity and reflection, and create transformative learning experiences.

Founded by Larry Aldrich in , The Aldrich is dedicated to fostering innovative artists whose ideas and interpretations of the world around us serve as a platform for dialogue and learning. The Aldrich is one of the few independent, non-collecting contemporary art museums in the United States, the only museum in Connecticut devoted to contemporary art, and one of just twenty museums in Connecticut and art museums in the country to be accredited by the American Alliance of Museums.

The Aldrich has a year track record of identifying and supporting significant artists at seminal moments in their development and interpreting their work for a broad and cross-generational public, and a history of engaging the community through exhibitions that investigate current cultural and societal issues as well as complementary art-making workshops and thought-provoking interdisciplinary programs. The ideas motivating the artists, and how their concepts and endeavors are presented to diverse audiences, define the activities and character of the Museum.

The Manager of Academic Programs Manager reports to and works closely with the Director of Public Programs and Audience Engagement Director , to research, develop, implement and assess pioneering programs for schools, educators, and the adult volunteer Museum Guide team. The Manager will develop innovative, forward thinking strategies that increase service to regional schools and educators, and position The Aldrich as a leader in the field of museum education.

These strategies and the resulting programs will be developed in dialogue with administrators, educators, and curriculum specialists from the schools and districts served by The Aldrich. The Manager will maintain an active, productive, and communicative relationship with area educators, administrators, parents, regional arts and culture institutions, arts education organizations, and other institutions and individuals whose mission it is to serve students and teachers.

In keeping with the collaborative and cooperative structure of the Public Programs and Education department, the Manager will work in partnership with the Manager of Education Programs and Youth Initiatives to 1 develop pilot programs for all audiences; 2 develop and foster key partnerships with schools, school districts, teachers, school administrators, and community and peer organizations; 3 develop interpretive content for programs for all visitors, including but not limited to lesson plans for school groups, family gallery guides, and adult tour scripts; and 4 train the Museum Guide team.

The Manager will develop and maintain a professional team of Museum Guides who are prepared to serve as museum ambassadors and gallery educators, equipped with the most current and relevant understanding of museum education theory and practice. Responsibilities will include, but are not limited to: The successful candidate is an innovative thinker and dynamic leader with a minimum of 5 years experience working in a museum, art center, or similar setting with docent volunteers, as well as demonstrable excellence in teaching K school and educator audiences with original works of art in a museum or gallery setting.

The candidate will have experience developing fundable, innovative school and teacher programs, setting strategic goals for programs and prioritizing tasks to support these goals, and implementing and evaluating such programs. The successful candidate is a self-motivated individual who excels in a fast-paced creative environment and thinks both strategically and logistically. The candidate will possess excellent organizational and communication skills, and provide evidence of well-developed collaborative skills and experience leading teams through complex projects.

The exceptional candidate will have demonstrable experience in developing public programs for all ages, including youth, family and adult. Experience working with artists and in artist-driven programs and audience engagement required. A Masters Degree in art history, art education, museum education or a related field is preferred. Familiarity with Connecticut and Westchester school districts is preferred. Please send 1 a cover letter including salary requirements, 2 current resume, and 3 a description of a program for K students designed, implemented, and evaluated by the applicant to: Calls will not be accepted.

Only qualified applicants will be contacted.


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The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum is committed to: Consistent with these principles, The Aldrich does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, expression and characteristics, age, religion, national or ethnic origin, visible or invisible disability, veteran status, or any other protected status. Her exhibition at The Aldrich is dedicated to two important sources of inspiration: The outdoor sculpture, a geometric flower in stone and glass, is based on the geometry of a traditional quilt pattern. Adjacent to these influential works, on loan from institutions around the country, she also includes objects from her own collection.

Circumstance highlights inspiration and its influence across object- making, through the specifically commissioned work of six multi- generational artists. The exhibitions underscore the intersection of installation art and exhibition design, and show how the convergence of fine art, design, and non-art objects within the exhibition format informs and elucidates creative expression. In doing so, Circumstance attempts to explore the interstices where art and object come together, come apart, and reunify, by examining context, its many shifts and permutations, and tracing the movement of art and objects from the studio to the museum.

In the captivating maze of intersecting rooms, craft, found, utilitarian, historical design, and everyday objects will sit beside works of art, informing us as to how artists take inspiration from what is around them. Wurtz will take center stage in the development, conceptualization, and reception of their work, as the Museum assists them to reveal never-before-seen aspects of their practice. Generous support for Virginia Poundstone: Old, Odd, and Oval, will focus on her latest body of work, medium- to large-scale to site-engaged paintings that demonstrate her experimentations with new materials and fabrication methods as she combines hand-painted Plexiglas with colorful fabric patterns she designs digitally.

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Ridgefield, CT September Old, Odd, and Oval , part of the Painting in Four Takes series of exhibitions, will focus on her latest body of work, medium- to large-scale to site-engaged paintings that demonstrate her experimentations with new materials and fabrication methods as she combines hand-painted Plexiglas with colorful fabric patterns she designs digitally. Old, Odd, and Oval is part of Painting in Four Takes , a series of solo exhibitions that will provide a window into the practices of four engaging painters who imbue the medium with relevance and character. On view from November 15, , through April 3, , the exhibitions will mark the first time in over twenty years that The Aldrich has dedicated all of its galleries to painting.

The public are invited to a free reception celebrating the four exhibitions from 2 to 5 pm on Sunday, November Richardson Fund; and Fairfield Fine Art. Rommel will debut a series of new paintings presented alongside small works from to The oil paintings range from head to body size, and oscillate between cool and warm palettes, color fields of denim blues, moody greys, creamy whites, salmon pinks, and citrus hues.

Two Italians, Six Lifeguards is part of Painting in Four Takes , a series of solo exhibitions that will provide a window into the practices of four engaging painters who imbue the medium with relevance and character. Turkish-born artist Hayal Pozanti will debut a new series of paintings and digital animations in her first solo museum exhibition, Deep Learning , to be presented at The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum as part of the Painting in Four Takes series from November 15, , through April 3, The practice of Hayal Pozanti spans painting, digital animation, and sculpture.

For the exhibition, she will debut a new series of paintings and digital animations. Pozanti negotiates two opposing image-producing interfaces, the digital, with its mechanical, frenetic pace, and traditional studio practice, with its slowness, imperfection and tactile insistence.

Deep Learning is part of Painting in Four Takes , a series of solo exhibitions that will provide a window into the practices of four engaging painters who imbue the medium with relevance and character. Hayal Pozanti was born in Istanbul in and now lives in New York. In a career that spans three decades, Steve DiBenedetto has established himself as an idiosyncratic artist who has brought the pursuit of painting into the unpredictable chaos and flux that categorize the Postmodern world.

The artist has consistently rejected formalism throughout an era where both formal and conceptual approaches to painting have become de rigueur, taking a position where the canvas and the act of painting initiate a site for struggle, invention, and, ultimately, reinvention. The exhibition will include works from to the present with a focus on the past five years. Evidence of Everything is part of Painting in Four Takes , a series of solo exhibitions that will provide a window into the practices of four engaging painters who imbue the medium with relevance and character.

Today, painting is embedded in the broad debate. For more than forty years, B. Wurtz has been transforming throwaway objects found in daily life—shoelaces, plastic bags, food containers, buttons, socks, hangers—into elegant, poetic compositions that evoke the condition of being human. These inexpensive and disposable pans transcend socio-economic class, passing through every home; but by painting over the patterns and texts on the exterior of the pans with various colors of acrylic paint, Wurtz has transformed the ordinary into something invaluable.

For The Aldrich, he covers three walls of the Erna D. Leir Gallery, salon style, with over of his pan paintings dating from to Appearing like geometric abstractions, their compositions are predetermined not by Wurtz, but by a nameless maker, as he accentuates the full range of their embossed designs. The objects—from American Brilliant cut glassware to Wedgwood pottery and mid-century Danish modern Krenit bowls—represent a number of distinctive styles and periods, and have no immediate connection to each other. In bringing them together, Wurtz offers up a compelling dialogue about high art, decorative art, form and function, as well as the act of collecting.

Historically, Iznik reflected the patriarchy of the traditional society, with male artists and craftspeople producing work that adorned the walls of spaces mostly limited to men, such as their segregated quarters in mosques and baths. In Iznik today, women are very dominant in both the management and labor of ceramic production. A functioning ceramic fountain sits in the center of the gallery atop a carpet-like grid of painted tiles. In a tiled wall niche, small vessels are placed on a long shelf, a nod to their inherent domesticity. On the outside wall, a painted tile mural inspired by a historic Iznik panel from the Topkapi Museum presents central figures that resemble Art Nouveau water nymphs.

Generous support for Elif Uras: For artist Penelope Umbrico, light, and our changing relationship to it, has become one of the main subjects of a practice that challenges what normally constitutes ideas about photography and its presence in our lives. Umbrico is part of the first generation of artists to have participated in the transition from traditional photography to digital media and its attendant complexity.

Rather than just swapping one technology for another, however, Umbrico has completely embraced the world in which photography now finds itself—a world where light is transformed into code and completely disassociated from its original context, and where even the sun has become a digital artifact. This exhibition presents a ricocheting trajectory through photographic history: The most fundamental of all photographic technologies, the image in a camera obscura is based on contingency: Sun Screen Camera Obscura has taken the fundamental contingent nature of the image in a camera obscura and replaced it with information that comes from the Cloud: In other works in the exhibition, Umbrico has photocopied images of solar eclipses from the picture collection of the New York Public Library and transformed them both by hand and with cell phone camera apps, expanding and engaging the way that an eclipse inverts the usual roles played by the sun and the moon.

Through time these objects have fallen in and out of favor. The wall arrangement will consist of multiple casts of her works, designed as a tiled repeat pattern. This interplay of references, espousing both the high and low, explores questions of taste, originality and value. Nancy Shaver, in a career that has spanned four decades, has consistently worked to challenge expectations on the aesthetic hierarchies found in visual culture.

Her practice, which involves finding objects, making objects, and recontextualizing objects, has been informed by a critical eye that looks—and looks hard—at the culture of materiality with an attitude approaching that of an anthropologist. But in this instance, the exhibition is framed by the presence of two artists whose names have probably never been linked before: Walker Evans — and Sonia Delaunay — Evans is the American photographer who became known in the s for his stark depictions of life during the Depression, particularly in the rural south; Delaunay, the French Modernist artist, was a painter and textile and fashion designer.

She selects fabrics not just for the abstract patterning and color, but also for their encoded sociological meaning. The collaged fabric-scrap nature of these works resembles quilting, and Shaver is very aware that her process relates to vernacular fabric collage; but by wrapping fabric around wooden blocks and assembling the blocks into three dimensional objects, she is declaring them to be more a part of the world of art—not craft—a position where both making and philosophical inquiry are on an equal footing.

Generous support for Nancy Shaver: Reconciliation has been provided by The Coby Foundation. To join at this level, please contact Ashley Prymas, Associate Director, Marketing and Partnerships at aprymas aldrichart. Sara Cwynar, Cover Girl, , 16 mm film on video with sound, 9 min. Dash March 3, , to September 15, Dash, Untitled, , adobe, string, styrofoam, jute and wood and aluminum support. Harmony Hammond, Bandaged Grid 1, Upcoming residency dates Risa Puno, Common Ground , Courtesy of the artist.

Membership Library Join Today! June 24 to July Marina Zurkow was born in in New York City, where she lives and works. July 16 to August 5: Jillian Mayer was born in in Miami, Florida, where she lives and works. August 6 to August 27 to September Connecticut Post Extensive Aldrich exhibit explores tabletop art objects June Richard Klein, exhibitions director. Xaviera Simmons Underscore September 22, , to March 9, Richard Klein, exhibitions director Each image in the exhibition is accompanied by a recording of an iconic song performed by the musical artist whose fans are portrayed. Martin Creed Scales September 22, , to March 9, Jack Whitten Evolver April 6, , to July 6, Richard Klein, exhibitions director Jack Whitten: Michael Joo Drift April 6, , to September 21, This exhibition has been generously supported, in part, by Cynthia and Stuart Smith.

Richard Klein, exhibitions director Ernesto Neto was born in in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, where he currently lives and works. This exhibition is supported, in part, by the Stanley Family Fund. Genesis Belanger, Double Cherry , Courtesy of the artist and Mrs.

Objects Like Us — Installation Images. Analia Segal contra la pared May 20, , to September 23, Related Events Spinning a Yarn: Artforum Previews Analia Segal: The Brooklyn Rail Analia Segal: Contra la pared September Almost Everything on the Table — Installation Images. On Edge — Installation Images. Kitchen Arrangement — Installation Images. T Magazine T Introduces: Handheld Handheld May 20, , to January 13, Handheld — Installation Images.

Alex Schweder and Ward Shelley: A New Era Shared Space: A New Era October 1, , to April 22, Tony Matelli Hera May 6, , to January 1, Tony Matelli, Hera, Courtesy of the artist and Marlborough Contemporary, New York. H Is For House. Downloads Download the PDF. My Potential Future Past. Just Left Feel Right. Exhibition Virginia Overton May 1, , to February 5, The Museum Founded by Larry Aldrich in , The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum is dedicated to fostering the work of innovative artists whose ideas and interpretations of the world around us serve as a platform to encourage creative thinking.

Supporters The Aldrich, in addition to significant support from its Board of Trustees, receives contributions from many dedicated friends and patrons. For additional information and images, please contact: Continuous Service Altered Daily.