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Clarinet Sonatas by Blackwood and Reger

He owes Otto Vrieslander a response to his recent written work, but he feels that Vrieslander does not truly understand Schenker's cause, does not have the same "orientation" towards it as he, and expresses himself poorly. Weisse, he says, could have done things better. However, all this pettiness is nothing compared with the achievement of Meisterwerk 2, and of the "crowning" work that will soon follow. Schenker speaks of Hoboken's Photogrammarchiv as a "grand contribution," and of the work to be done there; reports on a copy of Beethoven Sonata, Op.

Schenker sympathizes with Cube over the hostilities he faces; contrasts his own theory to the approach of Riemann. Has arranged for Hammer portraits to be sent to Cube [for bookshop exhibits], and directs him to biographical information about himself. Describes the trials of his 20s, which were surpassed by the difficulties he faced later with publishers and organizations.

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Upholds Joachim and Messchaert as models of performance art, and speaks of his contact with Brahms. Cube reports on Scheuermann exhibit, and consequent interest and sales, encloses associated newspaper article; also on recent lecturing and composition activity. He is about to return the Hammer etching. Sends best wishes for Cologne lecture-series; is planning to issue a folder of Urlinien for use by teachers, and may deposit his handwritten Urlinien in the Photogrammarchiv, which will be officially opened on November [25].

The "counter-examples" should be taken slowly. Heck to Schenker, dated November 24, Schenker reports the impact of his Urlinie concept on the educational world within Germany and in the USA. Heck to Schenker, dated November 29, Schenker reports on the autograph manuscript of Beethoven Op. Schenker inquires after Hertzka's decision on the "Eroica" monograph; gives his vacation address.

Sonatina in E flat major, op. 37, no. 1 / by Muzio Clementi - Details - Trove

Hoboken recounts recent travels. Reacting to Edmund Schmid's follow-up remarks, Schenker points up a favorable passage and comments wrily on a critical one. Schenker gives detailed comments, with music examples, on Cube's two piano sonatas, praising them highly and making suggestions for improvement. After reply to some of the more personal points in Violin's previous letter, Schenker welcomes his friend's efforts to look for a publisher for the Eroica Symphony monograph, noting that, in spite of the difficulties that Hertzka has caused him, his books are still in print and his status as a theorist has been acknowledged by the the fact that the universities of Heidelberg and Leipzig have expressed an interest in appointing him.

He feels that it is beneath his dignity to make a formal reply; but to illustrate what he means, and why he is contemptuous of Schoenberg, he provides several voice-leading graphs and other music examples concerning these works. Schenker advises that an analysis of the score of Beethoven's Missa solemnis should be taken at a slow pace. Vrieslander's article about Schenker for Der Kunstwart is too technical and too long for a journal with amateur readership; he has asked Vrieslander to shorten it. Schenker reacts to Hoboken's news that he has been consulting Breithaupt on piano technique, and defines Hoboken's character as a pianist.

Reports on his teaching. Acknowledging his recent letter to Jeanette, Schenker expresses his regret that Violin and his son Karl are still troubled by health problems and reports some recent news. Hoboken is prepared to fund the publication of a collected edition of the works of C.

Bach with financial support from the city of Hamburg , but Schenker is cautious about this because his paid involvement in the project might result in work that would jeopardize progress on Der freie Satz. He has been included in the latest edition of Meyers Konversations-Lexicon, and has received favorable citation in Romain Rolland's latest Beethoven book. Schenker assures his friend that he understands his difficulties, and that he can be proud of holding his head high above those who do not understand music, or are incapable of interpreting it beautifully. His own problems are focussed around money, especially as his brother Moses has not given him the second part of his inheritance.

He has sought to find cheaper ways of producing the music examples for his latest writings: Violin has just heard that Hans Weisse will be lecturing in Berlin in December; he plans to go there to hear him. His pupil Agnes Becker, returning from a trip to London, has discovered that Schenker's Beethoven sonata edition is much in demand, especially from students at the Royal Academy of Music. Bach contract is not yet clinched; hopes to see Schenker and Hoboken soon.


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Schenker summarizes the achievements and ambitions of several of his pupils and followers Albersheim, Cube, Vrieslander, Roth, Jonas, and Weisse , noting that Weisse is the most ambitious of all of these though he is not completely at home in the new theory. He fears that something might go wrong at Weisse's forthcoming lecture at the Central Institute for Music Education, and hopes that Violin will listen with a sharp ear.

Weisse will give a trial run of the lecture at the Schenkers' apartment. Weisse thanks Schenker for the essay "Rameau oder Beethoven? He is surprised to hear that Jonas has sought Schenker's help in finding employment, and urges Schenker not to write a letter of recommendation until a concrete piece of work materializes.

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He is about to go to Berlin to deliver two lectures on Schenker's theories, and has heard that Moriz Violin and Reinhard Oppel will be there; he would like to give one of these lectures at Schenker's home before a small audience of his most dedicated pupils, and suggests a date and time for this.

Hoboken may stay at the Semmering spa for a few more days, and discusses his next appearance for a lesson. Hoboken encloses a check for 39 past lessons and reports on his work during the summer. Jonas reports on his course on Schenker's theory at the Stern Conservatorium, two forthcoming lectures, an article intended for publication, two radio talks and a radio recital; includes reference to his later textbook Das Wesen des musikalischen Kunstwerks. Jonas still has no response from Hoboken re: Thanks Schenker for sending Brahms's Octaven u. Quinten, expresses his longing for Der freie Satz, sends an example of his work, and expresses concern over his future.

Schenker congratulates Cube on the submitted work and offers analytical comments; and laments the economic conditions for musicians. Hitler has done "historical service" in getting rid of Marxism; someone is needed to get rid of musical Marxists; Schenker has created the tools. Hoboken is gratified by Schenker's praise of his song compositions; — He will continue his Chopin projects someday, but is preoccupied with the worsening European political situation; — He comments on Kleiber, Max Graf, on Goos's estimate of Schenker's importance, and returns newspaper clippings that Schenker has sent him with comments.

Cube reports on his poor health and straitened cirumstances, teaching at two conservatories and private pupils; he eagerly awaits Der freie Satz, and reports on his investigation of diatonic systems. Schenker congratulates Cube on the graph he has sent, and reports on Der freie Satz and the continuation of the Urlinie-Tafeln.

Mix - Clementi - Sonatina Op. 37 No. 1 in E-Flat Major, for Piano (Complete)

Publication of Jonas's book has been delayed until June 22; — he may give a lecture in conjunction with Edwin Fischer; — his Beethoven sketches article is in press; — Hoboken is considering Jonas's proposed elucidatory edition plan in conjunction with a putative publication by the Photogram Archive. Once Der freie Satz is in print, he will give his mind to the continuation of the Urlinie-Tafeln. Schenker's name is included in the Spanish Enciclicopedia universale. Diary entry by Schenker for 27 August Diary entry by Schenker for 1 October Diary entry by Schenker for 4 October Diary entry by Schenker for 7 November Diary entry by Schenker for 13 November Diary entry by Schenker for 19 November Diary entry by Schenker for 29 November Diary entry by Schenker for 30 November Diary entry by Schenker for 1 December Diary entry by Schenker for 2 December Diary entry by Schenker for 6 December Diary entry by Schenker for 12 December Diary entry by Schenker for 26 January Diary entry by Schenker for 6 February Diary entry by Schenker for 23 March Diary entry by Schenker for 9 April Diary entry by Schenker for 12 April Diary entry by Schenker for 23 April Diary entry by Schenker for 24 April Diary entry by Schenker for 21 June Diary entry by Schenker for 29 July Diary entry by Schenker for 8 January Diary entry by Schenker for 15 January Diary entry by Schenker for 13 February Diary entry by Schenker for 26 February Diary entry by Schenker for 15 November Diary entry by Schenker for 4 February Diary entry by Schenker for 2 August Diary entry by Schenker for 11 August Diary entry by Schenker for 14 September Diary entry by Schenker for 16 October Diary entry by Schenker for 27 October Diary entry by Schenker for 28 October Diary entry by Schenker for 31 October Diary entry by Schenker for 22 November Diary entry by Schenker for 25 November Diary entry by Schenker for 10 January Diary entry by Schenker for 23 January Diary entry by Schenker for 7 March Diary entry by Schenker for 11 March Diary entry by Schenker for 27 April Diary entry by Schenker for 30 April Diary entry by Schenker for 6 May Diary entry by Schenker for 23 May Diary entry by Schenker for 9 July Diary entry by Schenker for 1 August Diary entry by Schenker for 22 September Diary entry by Schenker for 23 September Diary entry by Schenker for 25 September Diary entry by Schenker for 26 September Diary entry by Schenker for 3 October Diary entry by Schenker for 6 October Diary entry by Schenker for 25 October Diary entry by Schenker for 10 November Diary entry by Schenker for 19 December Diary entry by Schenker for 19 January Diary entry by Schenker for 9 March Diary entry by Schenker for 10 March Diary entry by Schenker for 9 May Diary entry by Schenker for 12 May Diary entry by Schenker for 17 May Diary entry by Schenker for 18 May Diary entry by Schenker for 19 May Diary entry by Schenker for 21 May Diary entry by Schenker for 22 May Diary entry by Schenker for 28 May Diary entry by Schenker for 7 June Diary entry by Schenker for 1 July Diary entry by Schenker for 3 July Diary entry by Schenker for 15 July Diary entry by Schenker for 25 July Diary entry by Schenker for 4 August Diary entry by Schenker for 8 September Diary entry by Schenker for 15 September Diary entry by Schenker for 27 September Diary entry by Schenker for 24 December Diary entry by Schenker for 7 December Diary entry by Schenker for 16 December Diary entry by Schenker for 3 September Diary entry by Schenker for 7 October Diary entry by Schenker for 11 May Diary entry by Schenker for 25 May Diary entry by Schenker for 31 July Diary entry by Schenker for 12 September Diary entry by Schenker for 6 January Diary entry by Schenker for 13 January Diary entry by Schenker for 22 March Diary entry by Schenker for 8 April Diary entry by Schenker for 9 August Diary entry by Schenker for 5 September Diary entry by Schenker for 9 September Diary entry by Schenker for 18 September Diary entry by Schenker for 20 September Diary entry by Schenker for 8 October Diary entry by Schenker for 15 October Diary entry by Schenker for 20 October Diary entry by Schenker for 16 November Diary entry by Schenker for 20 November Diary entry by Schenker for 4 December Diary entry by Schenker for 5 December Diary entry by Schenker for 26 December Diary entry by Schenker for 29 December Diary entry by Schenker for 2 January Sonata in C Minor D Adagio for Piano Trio D Capriccio Brillante for Piano and Orchestra op.

Grande Sonate in F Minor op. Novellette in F Sharp Minor op. Concerto for Piano and Orchestra in A Minor op. Fantaisie-Impromptu in C Sharp Minor, op. Valse in A Minor, op.


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Valse in C Sharp Minor, op. Valse in A Flat Major, op. Valse in B Minor, op. Nocturne in A Flat Major, op. Nocturne in G Major, op. Tarantelle in A Flat Major, op. Grande Etude de Paganini no. Rhapsody in B Minor, op. Rhapsody in G Minor, op. Don't show me this message again. Piano Sonata in C major, Op 37 No 1 composer. May Total duration: The first one, in C major, starts off with a theme of a sort that Clementi often writes: The last bit of melodic material upon which the movement is built comes in similar garb, contributing to a pervasive air of conscious primitivism.

The second sonata, too, begins with a theme accompanied by a tonic pedal point or drone, this one in simple repeated notes. But here the pedal point, G, has an inconspicuous F sharp upbeat attached, and Clementi makes that semitone shift a central building block of what turns out to be a strong movement.