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Jay dagegen lebt das Chaos, tanzt auf jeder occasion und hat mit festen Beziehungen absolut nichts am Hut. The able, convinced, and sometimes ruthless heroine of Daughter of the Pirate King is again during this action-packed sequel that supplies rousing excessive seas adventures and the right sprint of magic. Alosa's venture is eventually entire. By Jessie Hilb A poignant and empowering teenager novel of grief, unrequited love, and discovering convenience in one's personal skin. The second book of the Left Hand Writing Skills series containing a further 28 worksheets begins with revision of the essential letter formation exercises in Book 1.

The following worksheets focus on the flow of letters into word formation.


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The objectives of Book 1 are to establish good basic habits of paper positioning and pencil hold and to develop the fine motor skills needed for accurate consistent writing. Nice looking book has minor edge wear. Used - Very Good. Great condition for a used book! Shipped to over one million happy customers. Your purchase benefits world literacy! Shows some signs of wear and may have some markings on the inside.

Dominion Woolens and Worsteds Pheasants perch and fly on this vintage style pattern Raglan sleeve or square shoulder button or Zipper front. Fair condition softcover pattern has worn and separated at one of the folds. Direct From the Publisher! But there's a murkier side, too. Becky Knott, her teacher, says that Juana rarely takes assignments home, and they don't always make it back. During her 15 years in Grandview, Mrs. Knott has seen countless migrant students filter through, many of whom, even at that young age, "come in low because they haven't been in one place long enough to learn anything.

Though he is clearly at the top of his class, impatient as his classmates struggle to sound out words - rugs, pop, stop, swimming - whispering answers to Sergio on his right, he reads at a first-grade level. Twenty-four percent of the district's migrant students are a year behind grade level; 2 percent are two or more years behind, according to the state's Migrant Student Data and Recruitment Office.

The 44, migrant students statewide are performing at about the same level. Forty years have passed since the federal government, as part of President Johnson's Great Society program, promised to educate all children. The Migrant Education Program was created in , at a time when just 1 in 10 migrant students finished high school. In the '80s, graduation rates reached about 50 percent - still one of the lowest for any group - where they hover today.

President Bush signed the No Child Left Behind Act NCLB in , reauthorizing Johnson's education law and reaffirming a commitment to all students, with a special pledge to poor and minority families. And in places with year-round growing seasons, where rows of crops have long abutted school buildings, many districts are successfully addressing migrant students' needs.

Even tiny Montana, with just 1, migrants, is held up as an example. But in other states, where their presence may be newer, or where fewer trickle through each year, many migrant students linger in the shadows. Educators say that the goal of NCLB, to shine a light on subgroups such as "migrant" by scrutinizing their progress and holding districts and states accountable for their performance, is laudable. But, as with the law more broadly, it's the implementation that has drawn concern.

Another fear is what a battery of high-stakes assessments, with more states requiring graduation exit exams, may do to an already fragile group of students. And for the roughly 50 percent who graduate, there's the looming question of how to pay for college. The cost can be prohibitive on a family's subsistence wages, and those who are not citizens might not qualify for loans or state tuition.

But the biggest challenge in serving migrant students has been keeping track of them. The federal Migrant Student Records Transfer System, founded in , was considered a great achievement. Besides housing health and education records, it was credited with bigger feats, like ending measles outbreaks in migrant camps. In , the system was abandoned and replaced by a web of state-run programs. Now, the Education Department is looking into ways to help states link their systems, and plans to have the Migrant Student Information Exchange in place within the next few years.

But it may never be as wide-reaching as a centralized federal database. Grandview became the state's first migrant education program in It was she who discovered Marie's family living in an abandoned camper, cooking and bathing at a nearby labor camp. The three-bedroom single-wide, set in the Granvilla Mobile Court, where Marie's family now lives, is an immeasurable improvement.

There's nothing missing for us here. Warm, with well-coiffed dark hair, she's lived in the Yakima Valley most of her life. Her parents were migrants from Texas. But beyond understanding the struggle and the stigma of farm work, beyond acting as translators between families and schools, they recognize the dignity and lessons of the migrant experience. The Challenges of Migrant Education. They take great pride in what they do. For the few months before school started, the children climbed apple and pear trees to help their father.

Though they grew tired and their hands cold, Raul and Jorge say it was fun - an adventure like their drive from Mexico. But work dried up mid-December. For Armando this meant a sojourn in Nevada. Marie, resolute in her decision to stay, remained behind with their children. There was a time when schools hired as many as five extra teachers to meet the spring influx of migrants - so many students, he says, they practically had their own school. Classes started as late as 10 a. Today there is less turnover each year, as families hoping for a steadier life for their children try to eke out a living here year round.

He wants them to finish high school, a luxury he never had. And one day, he says in Spanish, "I hope they have careers and are able to do better than I have, working in the fields. Cuando husmeas en la historia de los apellidos, te encuentras con paginas de la historia que han pasado desapercibidas para el gran publico, pero que no por ello dejan de resultar interesantes. We provide you with a deep professional research into your family name: With pictures and maps. We also offer to you genealogical and translation services.

The need for naming people is so ancient as the very man. When two or more people have the same name and it is possible to confuse them, they are distinguished by means of a last name or a nickname. Kay surname in Lancashire and Cheshire, England. Mario Robles and his wife, Lenor. City of Malaga website: En este entorno y calles adyacentes se concentran una amplia oferta de mesones tradicionales y bares de tapeo.

Congratulations to Carlos Lopez Dzur, journalist, poet, historian Nuestro Condado Donan libros para promover la lectura.

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Saturday, March 19, 2: Orange Family History Center S. Yorba, Orange, CA Information: It will commence at You and your family are cordially invited to attend. Admission is free and the public is also invited to attend. This year we will recognize those "Super Patriot" families who had 3 or more brothers in World War II and the barrios and neighborhoods that gave more than their fair share.

What is Kobo Super Points?

We have identified twenty families who had 3 or more brothers serving at the same time during the war. In fact we found four families with 6 brothers, one family with 7 brothers and one family with 8 brothers who served! We also know that more than Mexican Americans came out of the neighborhood surrounding La Purisima Church in East Los Angeles, that over 67 Mexican Americans came out of a 4 block area of Orange and that over 80 Mexican Americans came out of the small town of Placentia.

Those numbers prove that we served at a higher number than our percentage of the population. Moreover, we know that most of them served in combat duty in the front lines. That patriotism must be documented and honored. We published their full color photograph and briefly detailed their World War II service. This year our goal is to triple that number in our second edition of that book. If you want to be acknowledged in our book this year you or a representative must be present at our event on November 12, Please go to our website: Please fill out the information form and send it with your World War II service photograph.

Please do not send us the original of your photograph. Please take your photograph to a Kinkos or Wal Mart and make a duplicate photograph. We must have the form and photograph by July 31, in order to guarantee that you will be included in the book. Currently, there are more than 85, Hispanic Americans on active duty, representing approximately 7 percent of all active duty personnel. Congratulations to Marcos Nava. Marcos has provided great leadership and vision in his outreach to the Hispanic Community. In , the first Hispanic troup was organized by Marcos in Orange County.

The troop successfully recruited 30 Hispanic Scouts. Van Nuys, CA On February 4th, I had such an wonderful experience, I just had to share. It was a 2-hour performance that felt like half an hour. The professionalism, pace, authentic choreography, intricate costumes, vitality, color, and joy was fantastic. It was a celebration of Latin American, Native American, and Polynesian song and dance, performed by talented descendents of these cultures. She added another touch to the evening. It turned out that Tammy is a descendant of Brigham Young, after whom the university is named.

With the idea of trying to get the words of the song, I got online and learned more. Go My Son is their preamble. Work, my son, get an education. Work, my son, learn a good vocation. Climb, my son, go and take a lofty view. From on the ladder of an education. You can see to help your Indian Nation Reach my son, and lift your people up with you.

I also bring an instrument that I invented called "Jaguar's Voice". I get lots of letters and comments about it. We have ruda growing in our yard and I've used it for earaches and toothaches for years. For earaches, I put a little branch of the leaves in gauze and crush the leaves with my fingers, just as I am ready to insert it into the ear. The leaves releases an oils and I have felt immediate relief.

For a toothache, I crush the leaves by biting down on them in the area that hurts, then I pack the curshed leaves around the gum and on the tooth itself.

Beaner Princess & the Flower Wars : Heather Michelle Marsh :

It works great for both uses, but the odor is strong. If you want other stories on this topic, search the Archives at latimes. In 19th century Los Angeles, county officials had a simple way to discourage ballot fraud. Handwritten logs gave physical descriptions of voters that often included scars and deformities from the era's rough frontier work. Laborer and Irish immigrant Richard Dwyer, for example, was missing his left foot, according to an inky entry in the leather-bound registration book.

A few pages later, oil rigger Frank Fray, from Maine, was registered, noting the second finger of his right hand was crushed. Both men could read and sign their names, the registry reported. Those vivid nuggets of the past are now stored on metal shelves in the basement of the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, down the stairs from the more popular dinosaur bones and stuffed and mounted lions.

They are in the Seaver Center for Western History Research, a collection of more than 1 million documents, books, photographs, posters and maps—even cattle brands on leather and Mexican-era court records - that scholars say are key to studying 19th and early 20th century Southern California.

Michael Engh, an associate professor of history at Loyola Marymount University. Pio de Jesus Pico was one of California's most remarkable historical f i gures. Born at the San Gabriel Mission on May 5, , he witnessed and helped to shape nearly a century of California history before his death in Los Angeles on September 11, Pio Pico's ancestry reveals a mixture of ethnic strains. One of his 17th century ancestors was a minor Italian count. His grandmother was mulatto Caucasian and African. His father and mother were m e stizos Spanish and Indian. Pico was the fourth of ten children three boys, seven girls bom to this couple and throughout his life he remained very close to all the members of this family.

During his long and active life, he rose from poverty to become one of the richest men in California and for a time held the highest political office in Mexican Califo rn ia. He was known and respected by almost all his fellow Califomios and by prominent American settlers as well. Always loyal to California's interests, he played an important role in the political and economic life of this state throughout most of his life.

He was part of the government of Mexican California from about until California became a part of the United States. Much of his involvement was as a revolutionary, dedicated to changing the departme n tal government to meet the desire of many Califomios for republican rule. Pico's involvement in California government eventually led to his position as Governor from until the Americans took over in He fled to Mexico to prevent the conquering Americans from capturing him, and consequently the California government taking him prisoner.

He owned the Pico House, Los Angeles first major hotel. In the same year, he built a large adobe home on the rancho, using it as a country residence 'when his increasing businesses in Los Angeles enabled him to leave his house on the Plaza. Life at El Ranchito was conducted much as it had been before California became a state. Surrounded by orchards and fields, it was a gathering place for his neighbors as well as business acquaintances traveling the large distances between settlements.

Pio Pico Mansion reflects the type of home and lifestyle that wealthy Southern Californians built for themselves on their ranches. In its present condition it seems relatively small and unpretentious, but during the 's and 's it was more than twice as large, and was considered by contemporaries to be quite impressive. During Pio's residence, it was surrounded by gardens with rare and imported flowering plants.

Southern California was not as impacted by the flood of American gold seekers as the northern part of the state. Life went on much as it had before the gold rush. The large ranches continued to operate, flourishing in response to the demand for beef to feed hungry miners. For a time Pico's fortunes soared. However, the unpredictable weather, the bad hick in business, and the unethical actions of other businessmen conspired to deplete his assets, leaving Pico with little more than his home at El Ranchito.

Pio Pico never learned English, since California was a Spanish speaking country, so he was sometimes prey to less than honest American business partners. As Pico's fortunes rose and fell his vast land holdings were sold off to pay business debts. In his later years, after many of his business ventures faltered, Pico spent most of his time at El Ranchito, but during his final years. El Ranchito was also lost. Deprived of his home, he stayed with friends and family, finally dying at the home of his daughter Joaquina Pico Moreno in The park is located in the city of Whittier, approximately 15 miles east of downtown Los Angeles.

Park grounds are currently open Wednesday through Sunday, fro m The historic house is open on a limited basis and by advanced reservation. Picnic areas may be reserved for group use. Although the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hildalgo protected the legal rights of Mexicans incorporated into the United States, a long legal challenge to Vallejo's land title cost him thousand of dollars and finally deprived him of almost all his land.

By the time of his death in , Vallejo was reduced to a holding of acres. Vallejo's life was in many ways was representative of the fate all Califomios faced under American rule. Their new country treated them as foreigners. By the end of the century almost all Mexicans and Mexican-Americans found themselves a beleaguered minority, with little or no political power, and occupying the lowest rungs of the economic ladder.

They did not understand how a few men could own such vast estates and raise only cattle. They moved right in on the ranches and became squatters. The federal government appointed a land commission to investigate ownership and began meeting in Most of the meetings were held in San Francisco. Translators were costly, lodging for families and witnesses were costly, lawyers worked for a fee which was usually a percentage of the property, and the all white commission required the ranchers to prove ownership.

Pio Pico and his brother had title to some , acres which was almost all lost to legal challenge. The California counties with highest Mexican-American populations are taxed at a rate five time greater than any other region in the state. The new Chicano movement. The earliest examples of the work were aesthetically raw posters and banners inspired by the farm workers' struggle and by protests over social issues in cities throughout the Southwest. It quickly grew into a more refined body of work that often was marked by familiar religious and cultural images—La Virgen de Guadalupe, Day of the Dead skeletons, pre-Columbian figures, low riders.

The genre, dominated by narrative painting executed with lush palettes, took its place as a distinct movement in the American art scene. Los Angeles—by virtue of its role as one of Mexican America's most important capitals, and the sheer number of artists working here—became the center of the Chicano art universe. Today, a rapidly expanding pool of young Southern California artists is actively redefining what it means to make Chicano art in the new millennium. Where the social movements of the past once supplied muralists and painters with a rich iconography to choose from and social causes to speak to, the new school wants icons for the events and experiences of its own time.

The far-ranging diversity of these events and experiences has caused a shift in Chicano artistic consciousness. What once was a necessary and useful catchall category now represents a more complicated set of choices and consequences for young artists who know their history from art school and MTV as well as Chicano Studies classes. This new generation of artists also reflects the larger transformation of L.

Perhaps no young artist better exemplifies the new rubric than Camille Rose Garcia, 34, who grew up in the suburban hinterlands of Huntington Beach and is the daughter of a Franco German muralist mother and a Chicano filmmaker father from Lincoln Heights. Her experiences and work perfectly reflect the crossroads at which this new generation of artists has arrived.

I'm one foot in and one foot out. I want people to care about my work because I want them to care about the world, about the Earth, about extinction. Adds year-old conceptual artist Ruben Ochoa: But if we just keep repeating the same iconography, it defeats the purpose of art: Chicano art is so young.

We can't start repeating ourselves. We need to mix and blend and make art from where we're from. It's the story of a community in the midst of a massive transition, from a civil rights past to a multicultural present, from being a geographically bound vocal minority with focused political and social aims in the '60s to an amorphous demographic dispersed across a city that now has no majority ethnic population. For Chicano artists in Los Angeles, the transition has led to a difficult question that often leads to multiple answers: Do you make Chicano art, or do you make art? But I was inspired by the Chicano movement.

When the old Chicanos recognize my work, it still means more to me than getting recognition from John Baldessari. But as Chicano artists move away from strictly identity-based work, museums and galleries continue to move toward it. I think a lot of people are tired of being curated by ethnic category.

Artists will be supportive of galleries or museums that want to show Chicano artists, but they also want to be expanding the parameters of their identity as well. In many ways, these debates started taking shape in the late s, when Chicano art was introduced to widespread national audiences through two major touring exhibitions: Resistance and Affirmation, The exhibits presented competing tendencies that continue to divide contemporary Chicano art.

The Corcoran show, which included Latino artists of various ethnicities and was organized by white curators, lobbied for Chicano artists to be included as part of a larger contemporary art scene, albeit as exotic, primitive outsiders. The UCLA show, organized by Chicano curators, lobbied for Chicano art to remain a strictly delineated identity-based genre, a singular entity with defined boundaries rooted in the struggle for civil rights and visibility.

When the genre went international in as part of what many observers hyped as a "Chicano art boom," French curators managed to have it both ways, casting L. Chicanos as visionary prophets of the urban future. Back home, the reality was a bit more sobering. Chicano artists might have been in vogue, especially abroad, but at home they remained on the fringes of the art establishment. Little has changed today. The number of commercial galleries showing Chicano work has not grown since the '80s the Patricia Correia and Robert Berman galleries remain constants , though long-established cultural centers such as Self-Help Graphics, the Mexican Cultural Institute and Plaza de la Raza continue as mainstays of the scene.

The latest effort to address this cultural void comes from L. The partnership already has led to the hiring of Rita Gonzales as an assistant curator and to a new acquisition for the museum's permanent collection, "The Great Blind Huron," a print by Camille Rose Garcia. There is still so little exposure on a local and national level. Are we still living in an era with that much bigotry? I can't think of any other answer. It's still about exclusion. That is precisely why actor and art collector Cheech Marin decided to organize "Chicano Visions: American Painters on the Verge," the first nationally touring exhibition devoted to Chicano painters.

We're done preaching to ourselves. Many worry that the show's emphasis on painting, the scant attention it pays to younger artists and its tendency toward the recognizable imagery of decades past misrepresents the diversity of Chicano art. They each have as much right to say what is or isn't Chicano art than anyone who went before them. It's an attitude of openness and cultural contact that pervades Ybarra's own work.

Although he respects earlier Chicano artists' political need to create a visual language for ethnic identity, he is more interested in how identities intersect and open up, creating new urban hybrids in which cholo action figures meet futuristic sci-fi low riders and Pablo Escobar is dressed in a Columbia space shuttle suit. But right now, I don't think I could say I'm making it. It's like saying I make abstract expressionist painting. I'm not an ab-ex painter. I can't go back and make that art.

I make contemporary art that is filtered from a Mexican American experience in Los Angeles.

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Ybarra thinks of it as the Edward James Olmos theory of Chicano art. He wants to be less like the actor in "American Me" and "Zoot Suit"—in which Olmos was prison tough and pachuco savvy—and more like Olmos' character in "Blade Runner. Like many of his peers, part of Ybarra's interest in juggling multiple cultural realities comes from his experiences in art school.

In the '70s and '80s, art school was less common for Chicano artists—a luxury that distracted from the political urgency of the movement. Now it's the norm. He studied with Chicanos and non-Chicanos alike, including renowned L. I'm not going to operate from a handicap position. Each Mission was situated in areas where large populations of Indians lived and where the soil was fertile enough to sustain a settlement.

As time progressed and more Missions were built, the footpath became a roadway wide enough to accommodate horses and wagons. It was not, however, until the last Mission in Sonoma was completed in , that this little pathway became a real route. The greater portion of El Camino Real is Highway , a part of the splendid system of California highways. It is a continuous road over seven hundred miles in length and is marked by the unique and picturesque Mission Bell guideposts which originally gave distances between the principal towns and directions to the Missions. The bells are placed along the road not merely as landmarks and guides to travelers but as testimonials to the work of the Franciscan padres who were the pioneers that settled California in The miniature bells sold in mission gift shops since , are replicas of the hundreds of Mission Bell Guideposts marking the El Camino Real.

Some of the old inventory made from to is still available from California Bell. The idea of placing a marker along the highway and in front of each Mission did not come about until when a cast iron 85 pound bell and piping designed by Mrs. The bells were inscribed, "El Camino Real The plan had been to place one bell along each mile of the El Camino Real Highway, in front of each Mission, and also selected historical landmarks.

By , a goal of bells was reached. One bell was placed in front of each Mission and the balances were placed along the El Camino Real Highway. Since then many bells were lost to road reconstruction and theft. After feeble attempts over the past 50 years, John Kolstad, President of Mrs. California Bell is now working with cities to reinstall the original bells in the remaining areas of the original route. Call your local City Manager for information on their installation progress. In gathering background information on the new California quarter, I came across an effort to stop the production of the quarter.

The position is well reasoned, in that the vote and voice of the people were ignored. February 9, Contact: Al Camarillo, camar stanford. A copy of Cervantes' "Don Quixote" rests on a shelf above a half dozen works on Celtic mythology. Like her books, Castro has spent most of her 85 years translating and preserving history. Most recently she completed a genealogy project that was more than four decades in the making.

The project held particular significance to Castro, who moved to Calaveras County in Her late husband, Kenneth Castro, was a descendant of one of the first families to move from Mexico to California, settling in San Francisco eight generations ago.

Castro said she hopes families will use the guide to trace their roots back to the state's Spanish colonial period. The book includes family genealogy, land grants and notes from through the s. Castro's project — which she typed four times on a manual typewriter — was originally more than 1, pages. It's now a comparatively svelte pages. The work, Castro said, culminates a lifetime of study, travel and work across the globe. For decades, she worked as a translator and writer for both the military and various news sources. Whether in foreign or familiar lands, she said, each experience deepened her love for history and language, and motivated her to complete the project.

Growing up in the American heartland — Mahaska County, Iowa — Castro never thought she'd record the history of the Golden State's earliest settlers. But from an early age, she knew that travel and new languages were among her passions. Castro graduated from the University of Iowa in , earning a bachelor's degree in romance languages, which included Spanish, French and Portuguese. Castro has fond memories of her time in the capital city. She gained a deep appreciation there for Spanish and Mexican history, an affinity that has strengthened over time. Many friends and area historians encouraged Castro as she compiled the thousands of names and dates included in her book, she said.

Army in the Panama Canal Zone. She worked for the Office of Censorship, reading letters written in Spanish and French that had been sent from Europe to South America, a home to several Nazi enclaves. Castro and her coworkers watched for any messages that might signal an attack on Allied supply ships sailing through the canal. Most of the work was tedious and most letters were harmless.

But in , Castro and her office helped foil a German plot to destroy a Grace Lines steamer sent to supply the Allies from Chile. Reflecting on her time and accomplishments in the Canal Zone, Castro said she never considered her work heroic. Two years later, at the end of the war, the U. Army needed translators to work in war-torn Berlin.

She landed a job in Berlin with the Army Prisoners of War Division taking notes for American diplomats as they devised rules for a new German government. Away from work, the horrors of post-war Berlin were all around her. Walking to and from her office during the winter of , she saw countless Germans starving and freezing among the city's ruins.

Castro returned to the United States in the late s, eager to pursue graduate studies. She considered enrolling at the University of California, Berkeley, but after spending time in the East Bay town she decided against the idea. She instead began work in San Francisco, but found her time there unfulfilling. So, she went to Washington D.

She again served as a stenographer, assisting American diplomats as they carried out the Marshall Plan throughout Europe. During this tour of Europe, she worked in Madrid, Paris and Vienna. Castro attended the opera almost every night while in Vienna, buying tickets for less than it cost to watch a movie in the United States, she said. She eventually returned to the U. There she used her knowledge of Russian — she had taken an intensive Russian language course at the University of Iowa — to earn a fellowship studying Soviet economics. But as the Cold War grew, Castro's interest in school waned.

She left Radcliffe in the early s to again work for the Army, this time as a cartographer. She worked with Russian maps of Siberia, changing markers and symbols from Russian to English. Despite contributing to the U. Castro met her husband, who operated a gem and mineral business, and settled in California in the late s. The two moved from Santa Barbara to Murphys in She took a job as a correspondent for the Stockton Record, reporting on the Calaveras County Board of Supervisors each fall during budget hearings. She later joined the Murphys Post Office as a clerk, working for 26 years before retired in Compared to her time abroad, she admits her Post Office work was a bit dull.

But come vacation time, she and her husband traveled, crisscrossing the earth, visiting opal fields in Australia and meeting mineral experts in South America, Europe and Asia. Castro continued to write during this time, contributing to several gem and mineral journals, and compiling names, dates and land grants for "California Colony.

She now lives at Foothill Village, a residential center that provides assisted living in Angels Camp. Easley said Castro will tell residents "bits and pieces" of her many lifetime experiences. Debbie Ponte, the center's manager, called Castro a great listener and "a wealth of knowledge. Sierra Views is a weekly feature profiling various people and places of the Sierra foothills; every one and every place has a story. Have a profile suggestion? Call the editor at or Personajes de la historia: Sus abuelos fueron de Juanchorrey, Tep. El abuelo del Dr. Don Casimiro de Luna L. El ocho de enero de y casado en primeras nupcias con Ma.

Mexicanos, cuyos hijos y nietos triunfan en los Estados Unidos y honran a sus mayores. A group of Mexican immigrants in San Diego is focusing on slowing down the exodus to the U. Their plan is to promote the export of home grown prickly pear cactus -- a celebrated Mexican delicacy. More Mexican eateries carry its Spanish name, "nopal", than the delicacy itself, which is mixed into scrambled eggs, burritos and exotic desserts in Mexico.

Herbal health websites claim it fights diabetes and cholesterol. She found the freshly-cut cactus leaves in San Diego flea markets, said Norma de la Vega, a reporter for the San Diego Spanish-language weekly, Enlace. De la Vega reported recently on a group of Mexican immigrants in San Diego hoping to import the cactus from their native Oaxaca to the United States. The San Diego group hopes the plant will help energize the economy back home by creating jobs in Oaxaca and in California.