Manual On the Internet (Thinking in Action)

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Drawing on studies of the isolation experienced by many internet users and the insights of philosopher such as Descartes and Kierkegaard, Dreyfus shows how the internet's privatisation of experience ignores essential human capacities such as trust, moods, risk, shared local concerns and commitment. Sponsored Products are advertisements for products sold by merchants on Amazon. When you click on a Sponsored Product ad, you will be taken to an Amazon detail page where you can learn more about the product and purchase it. To learn more about Amazon Sponsored Products, click here.

Going beyond the hype of the cybercrowd, Dreyfus a celebrated writer on philosophy and technology, asks whether the Internet can really bring humanity to a new level of community and solve the problems of mass education. Dreyfus' critique of huper learning provides much food for thought and raises the level of the discussions amongst concerned educators and technologists. Would you like to tell us about a lower price? If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

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Please try again later. In this book, Hubert Dreyfus presents a philosophical study of how the Internet experientially impacts our lives. His approach appropriately draws mainly on phenomenology and existentialism, so you'll encounter names like Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and Merleau-Ponty. The book is short and fairly easy to follow, especially if you have some background in Western philosophy. In reading the book, I found that Dreyfus pretty much articulates views I had already formed on my own many years ago, so of course I agree with him and I like the book.

Here are the main points: By contrast, Nietzsche argued for transcending our human limitations by using the emotional and intuitive capacities of our bodies. Development of real expertise generally requires the emotional involvement and richness of experience that comes from live face-to-face interaction between student and teacher.

This involvement is what enables us to maintain a grip on reality, develop trust in others, and gain the context needed to function skillfully in diverse situations.

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Moreover, surveys indicate that people tend to feel more isolated and depressed as they use the Internet more, so psychological wellness is also at stake. This can lead to trivialization, superficiality, and corresponding hazards, but it's still possible for people who are already knowledgeable and serious to use the Internet in ways that are more beneficial than harmful. To benefit from it, we need to control it and our use of it, rather than falling prey to it controlling us. This requires that we focus on our embodied existence, with all the pleasures and sufferings that entails, rather than naively fantasizing that we can meaningfully live in some sort of escapist cyberspace.

I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in reflecting on how the Internet can impact our lived experience. And I especially recommend this book to people who spend too much time in front of the computer, rather than interacting with real live people, nature, and the rest of the real world.

Despite a favorable finding that Internet has made life better p. It is in light of these studies that Prof. Dreyfus does a keen eye-opening analysis that weighs the benefits versus the dangers of Internet in our lives. He presents some interesting insights on the nature of conventional library-based versus online search methodology p.

Dreyfus's conclusion on distance education is that it has the ability to bring students to the level of competence, but not expertise p. Emotional interactions between teachers and students as well as among students are essential for a learning process that leads to a thorough knowledge and practical skills usable in the field. Conscientious teachers will not settle or be satisfied with teaching remote students. Conscientious students acknowledge the limitation of online classes and yearn for an onsite instructor they can establish eye contacts with and treat as not merely a source of information, but also as someone who is willing to encourage, compliment, correct and rebuke them personally.

The most important diagnosis that Dreyfus provides is on the subject of telepresence and disembodied interactions ch.

Thinking in Action

What makes a human being unique and distinguishes us from machines is that we not only have an intellect, emotion and will, but also the ability for them to interact with each other within ourselves as well as with other human beings. The Internet may have an impressive and seemingly infinite intelligence to provide almost any information we need and the technology to bring people all over the world closer together via social networks, text, voice and video communications.

But it doesn't have emotion and will and in my opinion, will never replace a true human emotion and face-to-face, physical interaction with a virtual one. A virtual interaction not only lacks these qualities but also poses some dangers as well. First, it tends to deceive us into thinking that the Internet provides all our emotional needs p. Second, it discourages commitment or unconditional commitment as Dreyfus puts it and risk-taking or bold experimentation to use Dreyfus's term, p.

Third, it numbs our ability to discern what is important. As with education, Dreyfus feels that personal embodiment is vital to making groups work. What he's done here is introduce new, philosophical ways to think more deeply about what it truly does and does not offer. Jul 09, Wendelle So added it. First criticism is the oft-repeated adage that data on the internet are not arranged hierarchically like library catalogues and are not managed by knowledgeable experts, leading to information searches that are like 'finding a needle in a needle stack'.

I feel the author fails to balance this chapter with information on the benefi this book is not a Meditation on the Internet, rather it is a Collection of Four Criticisms on the Internet, most of which are biased and some empirically unsupported. I feel the author fails to balance this chapter with information on the benefits of such an anarchical arrangement, or why the internet historically developed as such. Second criticism is on the true effectiveness of distance learning, or online learning, which the author disparages repeatedly as 'correspondence courses'.

He supports his criticism with a strange, seemingly self-concocted model of learning through stages from beginner to expert, distinguishing each with an accompanying rubric of accomplishments. The model is common-sensical enough, but not backed by any study or empirical data. His main argument is that universities provide mastery in learning that online classes can't provide, because a they provide physical apprenticeships necessary for true learning and b participation in actual classes and lectures require courage and risk-taking basically, this man says, the risk of raising your hand, being wrong and laughed off that then leads to an emotional involvement with the material.

These two arguments are easy to debunk and even the author provides the way, acknowledging the plausible role of simulations in online learning as an alternative for apprenticeships. He then dismisses them as insufficient and proceeds with his pet points. As I've said these couple of pet points are not backed by empirical data, which one can easily harvest from the rising practices of online learning.

For a , the author's pet example, mastery of chess, suffices. Most chess masters today learn their craft through thousands of computer chess programs, rapid-fire simulations, and online chess books which profit them the additional benefit of interactive learning that ordinary books cannot provide. For b , I don't see that people are less emotionally invested to online learning than physically located learning. I'm sure there are a lot of online learners who are more invested than bored college kids who do sit through lectures and volunteer fearless opinions during tutorial without really grappling with the material.

Though the criticisms the author raises in this book are thought-provoking and he seasons his chapters with a deep knowledge of what Plato or Nietzsche said about this or that, you'd think these authors would be a bit tougher on themselves and the standards of thought they'd bring before submitting to publication. Sep 17, Arjun Ravichandran rated it really liked it. Part of the excellent 'Thinking in Action' series that brings together leading thinkers to bear their attention down on the complex issues of the day, this slim treatise on the internet is written by a leading Heidegger scholar ; thus, his viewpoint on the internet takes the power of its critique from Heidegger's analysis and concern with Being, and the investigation is thus a phenomenological analysis of how the internet molds, shapes and affects the human experience.

This Heideggerian thrust i Part of the excellent 'Thinking in Action' series that brings together leading thinkers to bear their attention down on the complex issues of the day, this slim treatise on the internet is written by a leading Heidegger scholar ; thus, his viewpoint on the internet takes the power of its critique from Heidegger's analysis and concern with Being, and the investigation is thus a phenomenological analysis of how the internet molds, shapes and affects the human experience.

This Heideggerian thrust is maintained, though filtered through Merleau-Ponty's emphasis on the primacy of the human body, as well as Kierkegaard's devastating indictment of public life of which, the author argues, the internet is simply a much much more potent and streamlined version as a the biggest barrier to individuals living a life of faith and commitment. The author comes to the conclusion that the internet is not merely a new technology, but an altogether different type of technology that has become a paradigm and exemplar for a qualitatively different understanding of the human condition in the 21st century ; one that seeks to make everything rational, efficient, public, and within one's immediate reach.

The book is basically an exploration of how the internet both propagates and recreates this public and deprimordialized understanding of the human condition, through an exploration of the internet's impact on fields such as education, community, and one's ability to commit to an authentic and meaningful life. It would help to consider this book along with Nicholas Carr's 'The Shallows' which also looks at the internet ; whereas the latter is focused more on the scientific and behavioral aspects of the problem, here the author is offering a philosophical more particularly, an existential analysis of a quietly urgent problem.

Having been like Rip Van Winkle during my three years in Russia, the book offered some well-written thoughts about many aspects of the internet. It gave me a foundation as I began the trip into social media. It was published last year in the Ensign. In the book, I was especially fascinated by the talk of disembodied telepresence, the failure of artificial intelligence and of distance learning , and a review of the Second Life site, where you can live the life of an Avatar in telepresence.

It was fun to get back into the computer realm again but anchor it with the importance of not getting too involved in it. For example, the book cites a Carnegie-Mellon study that shows the more one spends on computer social media, the more depressed one is. How does this relate to our modern communication and marketing? How can we use this remarkable technology but still keep our humanity?

I recommend the book for those interested in such a discussion. It is a quick read and pretty packed. Make sure you get the second edition. Sep 05, haider saleem rated it really liked it. Aug 13, Carl rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Everyone usuing the internet, either personally or professionally.

Finally finished this-- a great, easy to read yet insightful book about our use of the internet and the potential in the internet for aiding education. There is a very critical element here, but Dreyfus is not a Luddite. Even if you end up disagreeing with his arguments against the more optomistic statements about the internet's potential to better our lives, he at least gives the most thorough, intelligent, and informed critique of the internet that I know of. He writes from the perspective of Finally finished this-- a great, easy to read yet insightful book about our use of the internet and the potential in the internet for aiding education.

He writes from the perspective of philosophy, of course, but is very familiar with the world of computers as well, having a brother in the field and having been a major critic of the AI movement which does not mean he opposes AI-- only that he is critical of research into AI and the promises made regarding AI.

Too tired to write a more thorough review now, but this is a great book, short, easy to read, and both profound and relevant.

On the Internet (Thinking in Action): Hubert L. Dreyfus: ejisytoqys.tk: Books

Been meaning to finish getting through this for some time now, but I keep getting distracted by other books. Despite that, it looks pretty good. I've gotten hooked on Dreyfus by his articles on AI and phenomenology, which you can find online at his UC Berkeley web page. This particular book seems to be a very easy to understand yet intellectually respectable discussion of the epistemological and ontological issues involved in our use of the Internet.

Don't worry, Dreyfus is not a reactionary Luddite intent on obliterating the internet! He does tend to emphasize the weaknesses in the problematic positions of the more extreme proponents of AI and the internet, primarily by emphasizing that we humans are what we are largely, or perhaps primarily because of our embodied existence in opposition to those who think we should evolve into "brains in vats", or rather, disembodied intelligences , as well as by following in Heidegger's footsteps in pointing out the ways sometimes harmful in which technology affects our mode of "being-in-the-world"-- but it seems to me that he is interested in promoting a healthy way to live with technology, rather than doing away with technology.

Jan 20, Chris Friend rated it really liked it Recommended to Chris by: Excellent text discussing the implications of the Internet across social, educational, and philosophical grounds.

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Dreyfus makes a strong argument for the importance of embodied knowledge—an argument I've not seen in many texts specifically about the implications of the 'net, and certainly in none I've read about education and the 'net. He takes a Kirkegaardion approach to his philosophical argument that the Web adds complexity to, rather than resolves, dilemmas about quality of life and social i Excellent text discussing the implications of the Internet across social, educational, and philosophical grounds.

He takes a Kirkegaardion approach to his philosophical argument that the Web adds complexity to, rather than resolves, dilemmas about quality of life and social involvement.