Guide The Age Atomic (Empire State Book 2)

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And frankly, it felt a little too muddled when done in Empire State. But with The Age Atomic, it looks like Adam Christopher really has struck a balance with the universe he's created--or I finally started smoking from the same hookah as he. The visual of a robot army laying in wait was a cool one, especially of the foreboding it offers as a similar one is constructed in the original universe. And seeing two sets of villains, one of each universe, almost working in tandem to bring about the ruin of Empire State and everyone in it created all kinds of what-if scenarios.

Rad Bradley felt like a much stronger and more fully realized character than before, and Jennifer Jones as the newcomer in so much that I don't recall her from the first book added a new angle to the action, especially in the second half of the story. Plenty of old face from Empire State reappear, more than one thought a goner, so if you want to really appreciate every that is happening it's best to read the first book before attempting to dive into this one, because the plot really requires a familiarity with what's already happened.

And if you can read the two book back-to-back, all the better. There's lots of room for a third book in this universe, but all the loose ends are adequately addressed in the confines of this book, so worries of cliffhangers and unresolved issues are only fodder for the epilogue that teases a brand new dilemma.

Dec 04, Abhinav rated it did not like it Shelves: You can find the full review over at The Founding Fields: Shadowhawk reviews the sequel to the excellent debut Empire State by Adam Christopher. They have the ability to annoy, to frustrate, to amaze, to stun beyond expectations.

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Sometimes they will meet your expectations almost spot on, although that is a rather rar You can find the full review over at The Founding Fields: Sometimes they will meet your expectations almost spot on, although that is a rather rare case. Empire State my review was a fantastic novel. It was the first such cross-genre SF novel that I had read in a long time, and I was completely taken with the world and characters that the author had created. The undercurrents of mystery and thrills that are threaded through the narrative made for a reading experience that was as intensely satisfying as it was fun.

Most of all, the novel lacks a heart, that element of excitement and thrill, that was so prevalent in the debut. One of the hallmarks of Empire State was that the novel managed to incorporate a lot of different concepts, characters, events into a cohesive whole. Almost all the story-arcs progressed well enough and got a satisfactory conclusion that also promises a lot for the future adventures of these same characters. In The Age Atomic, characters and events were too disparate to ever come together for a satisfactory conclusion. Rad Bradley, one of my favourite characters from the previous novel and the protagonist in both, felt completely flat and dull to me.

For me, the vibe that I got from the character was that he has remained completely unchanged from the previous novel, that The Age Atomic represents a character reset, sort of. We saw him in Empire State in final third of the novel, and he was a fairly major character at that point.

Where The Age Atomic is concerned, he is almost as important to the narrative as Rad is since through him we see how things are progressing in the real-world New York since the concluding events of Empire State. Jun 10, Tom rated it liked it Shelves: Some time has passed since the events of Empire State but the fissure has disappeared from the Empire State. Since the fissure in Battery Park is the source of sustenance to The Empire State, the climate begins to edge toward an ice age as time goes on.

Audio Editions

While this is happening, Rad Bradley uncovers a plot involving robots. On the other side of the fissure in New York City, a mysterious blue woman made purely of energy I'm looking at you Watchmen heads up a secret organization that seems to be researching Empire State technology for no good. It would be hard to comment on this book without comparing it to Empire State.

The Age Atomic is a little lighter on the detective noir and heavier on the robots, airships, and odd superheroes. I found the story much easier to follow than it's predecessor because the plot was a bit more direct and the character's loyalties weren't in such a state of flux. I enjoyed the book more because of these differences - especially the more straight forward plot. In the end, the book was a fun listen, the characters were enjoyable, and I had some serious flashbacks of Watchmen down to the blue energy character.

I would recommend this book to people who like comic books, robots, super heroes, and detective stories As for the audiobook performance, Phil Gigante did a great job as usual. He was easy to understand and did some good voices for the different characters. I also found this book much easier to audiobook than it's predecessor because of the straightforward plot. I didn't feel the need to back up as if I missed anything this time around.

Apr 22, C. Daley rated it it was amazing Shelves: I can't say enough wonderful things about this series. I love the setting. I love the Science Fiction noir. I like the crossing of genres and how it feels like I am reading a well written pulp novel. I know Christopher will be leaving this world for a little while but if he ever comes back I am waiting to dive in again. My favorite new author. Nov 04, Enrique Latino is currently reading it. In The Age Atomic, two universes become intertwined and fight for survival. This results in Rad searching for a way to save his world from an everlasting winter and a robot army coming to wipe the city out.

Set in New York and a counterpart universe, the book describes the weight of our choices and the impact it has. One example is that without the fissure the city becomes cold and unlivable but without it powering the defenses there will be nothing to stop the oncoming army from wiping everyone In The Age Atomic, two universes become intertwined and fight for survival. One example is that without the fissure the city becomes cold and unlivable but without it powering the defenses there will be nothing to stop the oncoming army from wiping everyone out. The whole place is breaking up.

Along with the upcoming dangers, Rad has to deal with one more problem, Evelyn McHale, otherwise known as The Director. Evelyn is crucial for the fate of Rad because she is not human, she is part of the fissure that connects the two worlds and with that, she is feared. Feared enough to control the people around her, and do whatever she pleases. Overall, I enjoyed the complexity of the plot and the way it pieced together and lead to bigger turns in the story, creating a feeling of a never-ending climax.

I recommend this book to anyone that loves science fiction and the possibilities of different realities.

Jul 05, Johnathan rated it liked it. I wasn't thrilled with this one. The first was new and exciting. I didn't understand the villain's motivations or really anything that was going on in the Empire State. I'm still down to check out Adam Christopher's other robot series. Jan 14, Jennifer rated it really liked it Shelves: I finished it all in one sitting, partially because it was an enjoyable read, partially because I didn't have anything better to be doing at 2 AM. My immediate impression upon finishing is that this book feels like the middle book of a trilogy.

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I don't know if it's intended to be, although until I randomly saw this on a shelf at the bookstore, I had no idea that Empire State had a sequel. But the ending feels vaguely unsatisfactory, like there's more story to be tol This book was But the ending feels vaguely unsatisfactory, like there's more story to be told.

In terms of positives, this book feels like what it is - the sequel to a debut where in the interim, the author has gotten a better grip on his tone and found a clearer voice. The characterization in this book feels more fleshed out as compared to the first one, and the worldbuilding feels much less forced. There's more female characters, which is something I always approve of.

The action is better paced, as well; with the first book I felt like the build-up to the action took too long and the action itself was rushed. The Evelyn subplot didn't really click for me until close to the end, and I feel like I'll understand it better and like it more after a re-read. Nuclear power is a big plot point in this book, which I admit is something I don't know as much about as I would like, and as such, don't have strong opinions on.

The author, however, clearly does, which I will leave unspoiled for now. At the beginning of the book, there was a small scene of Rad contemplating his nature as a sort of substitute, an alternate version of a person in the Origin, and how that makes him feel, knowing that he's an echo of something "real". I wish that had been more fleshed out, but it was very quickly dropped. Jennifer, as a character, also needs more time on-page, I desperately want to like her character, but we need to know something about her besides "loves her brother and wants to learn more about what happened to him and the robots".

Overall, I really did enjoy this book. Like the first one, I sort of just felt swept along by the plot like "okay, here's some noir superheroes, and here's a detective, and here's some robots, and here's a nuclear ghost, and wow look at all these cool things happening yeah, this is badass".

There's never really any downtime, and I can't decide if that's good or bad.

The Age Atomic

I like some downtime in most books I read, but the timeline of this book is so tight that I think any kind of noticeable slowing of the plot would feel disruptive or out-of-place, like "uh hey, aren't you supposed to be saving the world right now? Mar 10, Marcus rated it it was amazing. The Age Atomic is set a number of years after Empire State, in , but in the Empire State the first novel is named after the setting , only a few months have passed.

In the The Age Atomic, we meet an old friend from the previous novel, Rad Bradley, who has to deal with a rather dire situation: The Empire State is plunged in a perpetual winter, Captain Carson, who took charge of the Empire State at the end of Empire State has gone missing, chaos is spreading and a mysterious figure known as T The Age Atomic is set a number of years after Empire State, in , but in the Empire State the first novel is named after the setting , only a few months have passed.

The Empire State is plunged in a perpetual winter, Captain Carson, who took charge of the Empire State at the end of Empire State has gone missing, chaos is spreading and a mysterious figure known as The King of th Street is assembling an army of robots, recruited from the Wartime navy. He gets help, of sorts, from a mysterious woman named Jennifer Jones who works for the City Commissioner but also has her own agenda.

Evelyn is mercurial, possibly insane and Nimrod does not trust her but is forced to cooperate. I also consider The Age Atomic to be the first real Atompunk novel, quite a feat. The story is again multi-facetted and there are once more enough twists and turns to keep the readers surprised and at the edge of their seats. Very few things in The Age Atomic are what they appear, there is a hidden agenda behind almost everything. The McCarthy era paranoia runs strong in The Age Atomic and adds a very fitting bitter flavour to it.

And just as in the real world: The wrong ones get accused of being communists.

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The Age Atomic also has its share of tragic characters, adding a layer Empire State did not have. Two of the main protagonists are destined to die, but… and I will not say more, it would be a major spoiler. And there are the discoveries, Captain Carson has made… Oh the implications! More fuel for WorldBuilder! The Age Atomic is another masterful tale by Adam Christopher. An action-packed noir Atompunk tale with more layers, facettes and twists than one would expect and which keeps the reader enthralled from the first to the last page. Apr 14, David Harris rated it really liked it.

I've changed my mind about this book a couple of times reading it, but for me, it came good in the end. It is worth pointing out, though, that it's a bit different from Christopher's Empire State to which it is a sequel. He is still living in the back of his shabby office, still walking the mean st I've changed my mind about this book a couple of times reading it, but for me, it came good in the end.

He is still living in the back of his shabby office, still walking the mean streets. However, this book doesn't have the noirish bite of the previous volume - it is more straightforward SF, albeit at the softer end of SF: It is a rollercoaster of a story, and to begin with I was a little disappointed at the lack of noir, and perhaps at the slightly forced plot, as Rad goes into action, saving the heroine, Jennifer I'm still not quite sure how that came about.

But the story soon begins to rattle along as twin threats emerge on both side of the rift that connects the Empire State and New York. There are forces at work engaging in a kind of arms race that mirrors the one the s US is part of. The plotting has many twists and turns, and although simpler than that of Empire State, it keeps the pages turning - and I think the ending is rather better. Don't, though, look for much logic in the mechanics of the interlinked worlds or of the mysterious Director - as I said, this isn't hard SF, not even firm SF.

It is what is is, an enjoyable romp. At the end, Christopher seems to be setting up for another sequel, and I look forward to that. Jan 03, Todd rated it really liked it. We return to Rad Bradley and the Empire State about a year after the events of the first book, and there is a lot going on. First, the Empire State has lost contact with New York, the Fissure connecting the two vanished, leaving the Empire State slowly turning into a block of ice while earthquakes rack the Pocket Universe.

Rad Bradley and Jennifer Jones are trying to keep things together while they are falling apart While not as good as The Empire State, the Age Atomic is still an excellent read. Rad Bradley and Jennifer Jones are trying to keep things together while they are falling apart, fighting robots and delusional madmen in the pocket. Meanwhile back in New York, Captain Nimrod and his group are squaring off against Evelyn McHale, the Ghost of Gotham, for control of the Fissure and the safety and future of the worlds beyond. This book is a very different animal to the first one, and that is neither a criticism nor a commendation of it.

By nature of the universe that he created, Adam Christopher would not be able to pull the same gag twice, and he really does a great job of mixing it up and making it different this time around. We get a strong sense of continuity from the first book, with many characters returning, but it does not feel like some sort of stale rehash of Empire State. The Age Atomic moves the action from a 's Noir style, which typified the Empire State, to a more streamlined 's espionage style.

This matches the primary time periods in the New York that the stories are based out of well, and gives you a sense of the strange dichotomy between New York and the Empire State. Overall I recommend this to any who liked Empire State, but also to anyone who likes a well thought out espionage story a la Ian Fleming. Aug 06, Josiah Hawkins rated it liked it Shelves: It seems that the empire state can never catch a break.

In the first novel they were under the threat of destruction, in Mr. Christopher's sequel to his first book, Empire State, the parallel New York is in trouble once again. In the second book the fissure connecting New York and the empire state has dissapeared, and this dissapearance has caused the city to go into a deep freeze. This steady decline in temperature will evetually cause everyone to freeze and something needs to be done. Meanwhil It seems that the empire state can never catch a break. Meanwhile, Nimrods government department has been aquired by Atoms for Peace, a new government organization that has its own goals.

The best thing about Mr. Christopher's sequel is the fact that it has improved, he has done the impossible and written a book better than the original. The largest change I noticed was the writing itself, The Age Atomic is written much better than its forefather. Christopher has added an element of charisma to his prose that makes the book an excellently fun and intriguing pulp.

I loved the overall plotline and the standard format of "you don't know what's going on" that was present in the first book. The story is original and I found myself continually trying to piece together the mystery. I must say that the characterization has improved but I still just didn't find myself caring very much about them.

Overall, The Age Atomic is a worthy successor to its parent novel. It's one that takes and improves upon the original plot and idea and is a quick and fun read. I see a lot of potential in Mr. Christopher and am very interested to see where his career takes him in the future.

The second book in his Empire State series takes place in a good bit of time after the first , yet in the Empire State only a few months have gone by. Even worse the Empire State has been plunged in to a perpetual winter and Captain Carson — who took over the Empire State at the end of the first book — has gone missing. We also catch up with Rad Bradley and meet a new villain, the King of th Street. Meanwhile in the New York of our reality, Nimrod is dealing with some chaos of his own.

Christopher has written a book full of winks and nods to the super hero comics of old, noir detective novels, and science fiction. All of these combine to tell a story so full of twist and turns that I was constantly having to flip back a few pages to remind myself of what the heck was going on. My only word of warning though is that this is not a series you can just jump in to. Which is a good thing, because the first book is stellar as well.

Nov 21, Adam rated it really liked it. Rattles along at a decent lick with threads weaving and knitting together, and occasionally snapping. Rad Bradley is back, and he's still trying to keep the Empire State safe from harm in whatever way he can. He's surrounded by robots, superhumans and shadowy government agencies; in other words he's caught in the middle, again. Adam Christopher's Empire State universe is a cracking place to be. Bristling with robots, superheroes and mid-twentieth-century tropes. The locations and characters are b Rattles along at a decent lick with threads weaving and knitting together, and occasionally snapping.

The locations and characters are beautifully realised, as they were in Empire State. The plot is immediately complex and tangled - which is no bad thing - and the reader is forced to follow along in Rad's baffled wake as things happen around him and frequently to him.

The only problem I had with The Age Atomic is that perhaps the complexity hid the slightly wobbly foundations. Indeed, perhaps most troublingly, the incident that starts everything off is never properly explained; or if it is, I didn't grasp the explanation.

It's an excellent romp and deserves 4 stars, but read it with your eyes open, and if you can explain everything, please let me know. I don't wish the above to sound at all negative. In fact, I only care so much about the bits of plot I don't understand because I was so enthralled with the rest. Mar 30, Damian rated it liked it. I really wanted to really like this, I did. I've read a number of Adam Christopher books now and I find some are better than others; Hangwire is the best of the lot so far I think, which would make sense with it being his most recent.

I liked Seven Wonders a fair bit too though it had a weak ending. This though, I just don't really like, it's ok perhaps but that's it. It's tepid, neither truly good nor really repellant. The plot ticks on well enough and there's plenty of action and yet at the sam I really wanted to really like this, I did.

Read the about page. If you would like a book reviewed on this site please request a review. All inquires are welcome. Promotion of any kind? A fun read with minor flaws. Maybe read an excerpt before buying. A few good points, but with significant flaws. I had to force myself to finish it.

Fatally flawed on multiple levels. Chris The Empire State is dying. Empire State More Reviews: Search All Things Urban Fantasy. Hot Off the Press. Support All Things Urban Fantasy! We use this revenue to keep the blog afloat. If you're a regular Amazon shopper, please consider using the link or search box and All Things Urban Fantasy will receive a percentage of your purchases. Subscribe via email Enter your email address: FTC Disclaimer Though All Things Urban Fantasy bloggers will sometimes purchase books for review, please assume that most books reviewed on this site were provided by the publisher or author in return for a fair and unbiased review.


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